arkansas soldier
arkansas soldiers
arkansas soldier
Tallie Harrell, postcard: Harrell was a self-employed farmer living near Austin, Arkansas, when he registered for the draft in 1917. He died in France on January 31, 1918, as a member of the 141st Artillery. His remains were returned for burial in his native state of South Carolina.
Ross H. Robinson, postcard: Robinson of Cabot, Arkansas, entered the service on September 26, 1917. He died on December 15, 1918, while serving in France as a member of the 608th Engineers. His remains were not returned to the U. S. for almost three years. He was finally laid to rest in 1921 at Pleasant Hill Cemetery south of Cabot. The Cabot American Legion post was named in his honor. BACK ROW FAR RIGHT
James Harris Atkinson, snapshot:  Atkinson was born in 1888 in Columbia County Arkansas. After graduating from the University of Arkansas in 1910, he pursued a career in education. Entering the service in 1918, he received his basic training at Camp Pike in North Little Rock, Arkansas. When the war ended he was receiving artillery instruction at Kentucky’s Camp Taylor. After the war, Atkinson became a leader in the advancement of Arkansas state history. He died in 1973.
arkansas soldier
arkansas soldier
arkansas soldier
Jessie O. Hutchinson, postcard: Born in Grange, Arkansas, Hutchinson entered the service on July 22, 1918, and completed his basic training at Camp Pike in North Little Rock, Arkansas. Though shipped to Europe, he was never engaged in combat. Mustered out of the service on July 5, 1919, he is shown here with a young boy he met in France.
Herman Davis, studio portrait: For his actions as a soldier in the 113th Infantry, the Mississippi County native was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, the Croix de Guerre and Medaille Militaire by the United States and French governments.  He died of tuberculosis in 1923. His burial site in Manila, Arkansas, is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Ward Webster Croft, (right) Martin Grady, postcard:  Croft was born at Sidney, Arkansas, on August 20, 1894. He was inducted into military service on May 14, 1918, completing his basic training at Camp Pike in North Little Rock, Arkansas. His entire service was completed stateside. He was mustered out on January 14, 1919. He died in 1989. He is shown here with his friend from Evening Shade, Arkansas, Martin Graddy, who also completed his training at Camp Pike. He died in 1993.
Arkansas soldiers
arkansas soldier
arkansas soldier
Rufus Eddie Calvert (left), postcard:  Calvert was born on August 8, 1888, in Carlisle, Arkansas. He served as a private in the 9th Sanitary Squad and died on September 26, 1958. He is buried in the Hamilton Cemetery at Carlisle.
Unidentified Faulkner County Arkansas soldier, studio portrait
Paul Peacock, Little Rock, Arkansas, post card.
arkansas soldier
arkansas soldier
arkansas soldier
Unknown, postcard, taken at Camp Pike, Little Rock Arkansas
Unknown, postcard, taken at Camp Pike, Little Rock, Arkansas
Luther G. Woodall, snapshot: Woodall was born on February 5, 1892, in Woodruff County, Arkansas. He enlisted in the army in 1917 and served in combat in the last major offensive of the war, the Meuse Argonne offensive. He returned to Arkansas after the war, where he resumed his life as a farmer. He died on July 5, 1991, and is buried in the Pumpkin Bend Cemetery in Woodruff County.
arkansas soldier
arkansas soldier arkansas soldier
William Jayson Waggoner, studio portrait: Waggoner was born in Lonoke County on November 12, 1889. He resigned his seat in the Arkansas General Assembly to accept a commission as a second lieutenant in the U. S. Army. He was seriously wounded in the last major offensive of the war, the Meuse Argonne Offensive. After the war, he resumed a political career that resulted in him becoming one of the most respected circuit judges in the state’s history. He died on October 25, 1968, and is buried in the Lonoke Cemetery. Unidentified, Camp Pike, Arkansas, postcard. Unidentified, Benton County, Arkansas, postcard.
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Lieut. Jefferson Rice, studio portrait.
Unidentified, studio portrait.
Archie Malone, Plumerville, studio portrait.
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Unidentified, postcard.
Unidentified, postcard.
Unidentified, postcard.
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Unidentified, studio portrait.
E. B. Gibson, Lonoke County,snapshot
John McClean, Lonoke County, studio portrait.
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Beryl Brewer, Cabot, studio portrait. Wayne White, Lonoke County, studio portrait. George W. Lane, Scott County, studio portrait.
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Jacob Prove, Lonoke, Eberts Field Pilot, studio portrait.
William H. Franks, Murfreesboro, 161st Infantry, studio portait.
Percy Miller, Lonoke County, studio portrait.
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Carroll Hedrick, Lonoke County, studio portrait. Ace Smalley (center) Sevier County, studio portrait. Albert Wilson (right) Lonoke County, studio portrait.
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Emmett Eagle, Lonoke County, studio portrait.
Crittenson F. McNew, Lonoke County, studio portrait.
Billie McNew, Lonoke County, studio portrait.
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James N. Eagle, Lonoke County, postcard.
Albert Wilson, Lonoke County, postcard.
Duffie Ewell, Saline County, snapshot.
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Dr. George B. Fletcher, Lonoke County, snapshot
Zollie Biggs, Saline County, snapshot.
G. Plumer Milham, Saline County, pilot, snapshot.
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Oscar F. Miller, Saline County, Congressional Medal of Honor recipient.
Edward Wilson, Lonoke County, studio portrait.
Walter Smith, Lonoke County, left in charge of shutting down Eberts Field, studio portrait.
     
     
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Before the Great War would end in 1918, almost 72,000 sons of Arkansas would in some way be involved in the daily life and death struggle to end the war to end all wars. Each of these men were inducted into the armed forces to defend their nation and home. Of these, almost 300 were killed in action and over 100 more dying of battle wounds. Total number of deaths attributed to the war was almost 2000.


Arkansas was also home to two military training bases. Eberts Field, located in Lonoke, was one of a small number of pilot training schools located in the United States. It opened in 1917 and closed with the end of the war. North Little Rock was home to a massive infantry base called Camp Pike. It too opened in 1917 and closed at wars end.